Live At The Whisky A Go Go: The Complete Recordings (Remastered) Otis Redding

Album Info

Album Veröffentlichung:
2016

HRA-Veröffentlichung:
02.12.2016

Label: Concord Records

Genre: R&B

Subgenre: Soul

Das Album enthält Albumcover

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  • 1Introduction (Live / Set 1 / Friday, April 8, 1966)00:33
  • 2I Cant Turn You Loose (Live / Set 1 / Friday, April 8, 1966)04:43
  • 3Pain In My Heart (Live / Set 1 / Friday, April 8, 1966)03:24
  • 4Good To Me (Live / Set 1 / Friday, April 8, 1966)04:09
  • 5Just One More Day (Live / Set 1 / Friday, April 8, 1966)06:04
  • 6Mr. Pitiful (Live / Set 1 / Friday, April 8, 1966)02:06
  • 7(I Cant Get No) Satisfaction (Live / Set 1 / Friday, April 8, 1966)05:28
  • 8Im Depending On You (Live / Set 2 / Friday, April 8, 1966)03:00
  • 9Ive Been Loving You Too Long (Live / Set 2 / Friday, April 8, 1966)06:23
  • 10Good To Me (Live / Take 1 / Set 2 / Friday, April 8, 1966)04:09
  • 11Security (Live / Set 2 / Friday, April 8, 1966)03:06
  • 12Respect (Live / Set 2 / Friday, April 8, 1966)02:10
  • 13Just One More Day (Live / Set 2 / Friday, April 8, 1966)06:26
  • 14(I Cant Get No) Satisfaction (Live / Take 1 / Set 2 / Friday, April 8, 1966)07:08
  • 15Any Ole Way (Live / Set 2 / Friday, April 8, 1966)05:10
  • 16These Arms Of Mine (Live / Set 2 / Friday, April 8, 1966)03:58
  • 17I Cant Turn You Loose (Live / Set 2 / Friday, April 8, 1966)05:19
  • 18Pain In My Heart (Live / Set 2 / Friday, April 8, 1966)02:49
  • 19Good To Me (Live / Take 2 / Set 2 / Friday, April 8, 1966)04:01
  • 20(I Cant Get No) Satisfaction (Live / Take 2 / Set 2 / Friday, April 8, 1966)08:31
  • 21Introduction (Live / Set 1 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)00:41
  • 22Mr. Pitiful (Live / Set 1 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)03:40
  • 23Good To Me (Live / Set 1 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)03:56
  • 24Respect (Live / Set 1 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)02:14
  • 25Just One More Day (Live / Set 1 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)05:56
  • 26I Cant Turn You Loose (Live / Set 1 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)06:12
  • 27Ole Man Trouble (Live / Set 1 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)02:52
  • 28(I Cant Get No) Satisfaction (Live / Set 1 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)08:33
  • 29Introduction (Live / Set 2 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)01:12
  • 30(I Cant Get No) Satisfaction (Live / Set 2 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)09:15
  • 31Any Ole Way (Live / Set 2 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)04:44
  • 32Ive Been Loving You Too Long (Live / Set 2 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)06:29
  • 33Im Depending On You (Live / Set 2 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)03:05
  • 34I Cant Turn You Loose (Live / Set 2 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)06:03
  • 35Introduction (Live / Set 3 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)00:28
  • 36Security (Live / Set 3 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)02:40
  • 37Just One More Day (Live / Set 3 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)05:19
  • 38These Arms Of Mine (Live / Set 3 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)03:12
  • 39(I Cant Get No) Satisfaction (Live / Set 3 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)06:44
  • 40I Cant Turn You Loose (Live / Set 3 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)06:20
  • 41Chained And Bound (Live / Set 3 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)04:53
  • 42Respect (Live / Set 3 / Saturday, April 9, 1966)02:36
  • 43Introduction (Live / Set 1 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)00:58
  • 44Im Depending On You (Live / Set 1 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)03:50
  • 45I Cant Turn You Loose (Live / Set 1 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)06:19
  • 46(I Cant Get No) Satisfaction (Live / Take 1 / Set 1 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)06:08
  • 47Chained And Bound (Live / Set 1 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)07:31
  • 48Just One More Day (Live / Set 1 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)04:33
  • 49Any Ole Way (Live / Set 1 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)03:59
  • 50Ive Been Loving You Too Long (Live / Set 1 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)03:55
  • 51(I Cant Get No) Satisfaction (Live / Take 2 / Set 1 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)06:01
  • 52Introduction (Live / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)00:44
  • 53Destiny (Live / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)02:55
  • 54Security (Live / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)02:57
  • 55Good To Me (Live / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)03:35
  • 56Respect (Live / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)02:13
  • 57Chained And Bound (Live / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)06:56
  • 58Mr. Pitiful (Live / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)02:18
  • 59(I Cant Get No) Satisfaction (Live / Take 1 / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)06:28
  • 60Ole Man Trouble (Live / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)02:40
  • 61I Cant Turn You Loose (Live / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)04:50
  • 62A Hard Days Night (Live / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)04:33
  • 63These Arms Of Mine (Live / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)04:15
  • 64Papas Got A Brand New Bag (Live / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)10:08
  • 65(I Cant Get No) Satisfaction (Live / Take 2 / Set 2 / Sunday, April 10, 1966)04:00
  • Total Runtime04:47:27

Info zu Live At The Whisky A Go Go: The Complete Recordings (Remastered)

Stax Records, an imprint of Concord Bicycle Music, is pleased to announce the release of Otis Redding – Live At The Whisky A Go Go: The Complete Recordings. In chronological order, this six-CD collection presents the entirety of Redding’s historic performances over three nights at the famed Sunset Strip venue. The seven sets, recorded Friday, April 8th – Sunday, April 10th, 1966, feature the singer’s popular songs of the time, including “Respect,” “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long” and his cover of The Rolling Stones’ “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.” Several of these recordings–all remixed and remastered from the original 4-track analog tapes–will be made available for the very first time on October 21. In fact, this collection will be the first to offer fans the chance to relive all of the sets in their entirety–including between-song banter by Redding–exactly as they were performed. Rounding out the package is a poster, plus new liner notes from Los Angeles-based journalist Lynell George and box set co-producer Bill Bentley.

Today (8/5), Rollingstone.com debuted an unreleased live version from the Whisky shows of Otis’ 1965 hit “Mr. Pitiful,“ calling it “electrifying,” “heartfelt” and “passionate.” Click here to check out the premiere. The excerpt includes lively stage banter, where Otis implores the Los Angeles crowd to “Holler as loud as you want, stomp as hard as you want to…Just take your shoes off…Get soulful…”

By the spring of 1966, 24-year-old Otis Redding was a bona-fide star on the R&B and soul radio waves. The singer was enjoying the critical and commercial success of his third studio album, Otis Blue, and was watching his singles cross over to the (typically very white) pop charts. Redding had yet to be fully embraced by a white audience, and this weekend-long gig in Hollywood–booked at a venue known more for hosting hippies, and launching bands like The Doors, The Byrds and Buffalo Springfield–was a shrewd move to introduce Redding to a new market. In fact, Redding would be the first major soul act to perform on the Whisky’s stage. In her liner notes, Lynell George adds context: “The Strip, like much of 1960s Los Angeles, had invisible but tough to permeate dividing lines…Redding began to see this three-night run as just the right spark to help him jump over all those many lines–from star to superstar, from R&B/soul to pop, from all-black rooms to arenas…” In the end, these Whisky sets (with Otis’ nine-piece band) did prove to be an important step in Redding’s career, and introduced him to the emerging counter-culture of the 60s. Of the Whisky shows, The Doors’ guitarist Robby Krieger said, “I remember standing right in front of the stage for the whole show. I never heard of Otis Redding before and I was amazed at the energy that he created on the stage.” A year later, Otis would be the star act at the Monterey Pop Festival, sharing a lineup that included Jimi Hendrix and The Who. Tragically, just as his career was reaching its peak, Redding’s life would be cut short in a plane crash, in December 1967.

Redding has been inducted into the Rock ‘n Roll Hall of Fame, Georgia Music Hall of Fame and Songwriters Hall of Fame. He has been honored with a U.S. Postage stamp and won a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Rolling Stone named him the eighth greatest singer of all-time and U.K.’s Q magazine ranked him at number four.

In his liner notes, Bill Bentley recalls, “Redding’s music had a power and urgency that grabbed you by the throat…There wasn’t any other singer like him then, and those of us who had discovered his music knew we were listening to the very essence of what soul music really was.” Bentley wasn’t alone. The Los Angeles Times’ music critic, Pete Johnson, covered one of Redding’s sets that weekend, calling the performance, “The most exciting thing the rock-worn room had ever harbored.” Redding’s legacy is well known – his brief but iconic discography speaks for itself; but these particular recordings will allow fans to step back in time, and experience a pivotal moment in the rise of a star.

Otis Redding, vocals
James Young, guitar
Robert Holloway, tenor saxophone
Robert Pittman, tenor saxophone
Donald Henry, tenor saxophone
Sammy Coleman, trumpet
John Farris, trumpet
Clarence Johnson, trombone
Katie Webster, piano
Ralph Stewart, bass
Elbert Woodson, drums

Recorded live at the Whisky A Go Go, Los Angeles, CA, Spring, 1966
Produced by Nesuhi Ertegun


Digitally remastered



9 September 1941, Dawson, Georgia, USA, d. 10 December 1967, Lake Monona, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. The son of a Baptist minister with the same name, Redding assimilated gospel music during his childhood and soon became interested in jump blues and R&B. After resettling in Macon, he became infatuated with local luminary Little Richard and began singing on a full-time basis. A high-school friend and booking agent, Phil Walden (b. Philip Michael Walden, 11 January 1940, Greenville, South Carolina, USA, d. 23 April 2006, Buckhead, Atlanta, Georgia, USA), then became his manager. Through Walden’s contacts Redding joined Johnny Jenkins And The Pinetoppers as a sometime singer and occasional driver. Redding also began recording for sundry local independents, and his debut single, ‘She’s Alright’, credited to The Shooters Featuring Otis, was quickly followed by ‘Shout Bamalama’. Both performances were firmly in the Little Richard mould. The singer’s fortunes blossomed when one of his own songs, ‘These Arms Of Mine’, was picked up by the Stax Records subsidiary Volt. Recorded at the tail end of a Johnny Jenkins session, this aching ballad crept into the American Hot 100 in May 1963. Further poignant releases, ‘Pain In My Heart’, ‘That’s How Strong My Love Is’ and ‘I’ve Been Loving You Too Long’ (written with Jerry Butler), were balanced by brassy, up-tempo performances including ‘Mr. Pitiful’, ‘Respect’ and ‘Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa-Fa (Sad Song)’.

Redding remained something of a cult figure until 1965, although he had already released a series of excellent albums. It was the release of the magnificent Otis Blue that triggered off a major appreciation, in which original material nestled beside cover versions of the Rolling Stones’ ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’ and two songs by another mentor, Sam Cooke (‘Wonderful World and ‘A Change Is Gonna Come’). His version of the Temptations’ ‘My Girl’ then became a UK hit. Complete & Unbelievable: The Otis Redding Dictionary Of Soul contained a stunning version of ‘Try A Little Tenderness’. This song was written in 1933 by Harry Woods, James Campbell and Reginald Connelly, yet Redding turns it into his own aching contemporary soul ballad. Meanwhile the singer’s popularity was further enhanced by the tour of the Hit The Road Stax revue in 1967, particularly in Europe. ‘Tramp’, a magnificent call and response duet with Carla Thomas, also provided major success, while Redding’s production company, Jotis, was responsible for launching the career of Arthur Conley.

A triumphant appearance at the legendary 1967 Monterey Pop Festival gave indication that Redding was about to attract an even wider following. He appeared on stage completely out of fashion with the colourful beads and bells of the audience, wearing one of his familiar dark green silk and mohair suits, with tie and smart shoes. His explosive set was, along with that of Jimi Hendrix, the highlight of the festival. More importantly, he calmed and unified the ‘love crowd’ like never before. He brought his music of black origin into the hearts of white hippies (many of them middle-class kids who had never heard soul music). Horribly poignant were the last words he uttered on the victorious stage at Monterey at the end of an astonishing finale of ‘Try A Little Tenderness’. He said, ‘I’ve got to go now, but I don’t want to’.

A few months later tragedy struck. On 10 December 1967, his light aircraft in which he was travelling plunged into Lake Monona, Madison, Wisconsin, killing the singer, his valet, the pilot and four members of the Bar-Kays. He had recently been voted the world’s top male singer by Melody Maker. This was highly significant because for the previous 10 years Elvis Presley had held the crown. He died on the cusp of greatness at the age of 26 not living to see how important a figure he would become.

The wistful ‘(Sittin’ On) The Dock Of The Bay’, a song Redding had recorded just three days earlier, was immediately mixed and released. It became his only million-seller and US pop number 1. The single’s seeming serenity about sitting on a jetty in San Francisco’s harbour, as well as several posthumous album tracks, suggested a sadly unfulfilled maturity as a songwriter. Although some critics now point to Redding’s limited vocal range, few could match his guttural sounding voice, which, at any volume could send shivers into the spine. Such was his emotional drive, and his distinctive sound remains immediately compelling. There is no doubt that Redding matched the smooth vocal intensity of artists such as Marvin Gaye, Curtis Mayfield and Al Green. What should also be acknowledged in addition to his quite remarkable voice is the considerable amount of classic songs he wrote, often with guitarist Steve Cropper. They stand as some of the most enduring moments of the golden age of soul music. Redding should be regarded as a giant of the genre, even though his achievements were made in just a three-year burst of unrivalled energy and explosive talent. Source: The Encyclopedia of Popular Music by Colin Larkin. Licensed from Muze.

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