Tennessee Moon (Remastered) Neil Diamond

Album info

Album-Release:
1996

HRA-Release:
03.11.2016

Label: Universal Music

Genre: Pop

Subgenre: Soft Rock

Album including Album cover

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  • 1Tennessee Moon03:00
  • 2One Good Love04:19
  • 3Shame03:31
  • 4A Matter Of Love04:36
  • 5Marry Me03:51
  • 6Deep Inside Of You03:53
  • 7Gold Don't Rust03:44
  • 8Like You Do04:05
  • 9Can Anybody Hear Me03:52
  • 10Win The World04:13
  • 11No Limit03:08
  • 12Reminisce For A While04:29
  • 13Kentucky Woman02:50
  • 14If I Lost My Way03:24
  • 15Everybody03:47
  • 16Talking Optimist Blues (Good Day Today)02:55
  • 17Open Wide These Prison Doors04:32
  • 18Blue Highway03:58
  • Total Runtime01:08:07

Info for Tennessee Moon (Remastered)

„Tennessee Moon“ finds Neil Diamond duetting with Waylon Jennings, co-writing with Harlan Howard, and backed by the cream of modern country session musicians. It's his Nashville move, and it's bookended by two wonderful paeans to the country life. The album-opening title cut is a country-rocker that features some jangly electric guitar, pedal steel and fiddle, and a lyric about a songwriter leaving Hollywood behind and moving to Nashville in search of Hank Williams' spirit. "Blue Highway" is even better. Co-written by Diamond and Howard (author of "I Fall To Pieces," "Heartaches By The Number" and many other country standards), it rejects big-city life with the quiet authority of a cowboyish acoustic-guitar strum and a pledge to leave town via the side roads (because the interstate "represents all the things I hate").

As it happens, the sixteen cuts in between, written with various Nashville pros, leave Hollywood only half-behind. Diamond still possesses the cornball pop craft that's always served him well; love ballads like "Marry Me" or "Everybody" would work equally well in any city, in any genre, for better or worse. The best songs really do take Tennessee to heart. "Reminisce," co-written and sung with Raul Malo of The Mavericks, has the dramatic flair of a Roy Orbison rock ballad, and "No Limit" has the juiced-up, acoustic country-rock flavor of the early Everly Brothers. Both songs raise the memory of Diamond the cool young rock craftsman.

Neil Diamond, vocals
Waylon Jennings, vocals
Buffy Lawson, vocals
Beth Nielsen Chapman, vocals
Rosemary Butler, vocals
Raul Malo, vocals
Hal Ketchum, vocals, acoustic guitar
Dan Dugmore, acoustic, electric & pedal steel guitars
Richard Bennett, acoustic & electric guitars, mandolin, guitarophone
Gary Burr, acoustic guitar, background vocals
Chet Atkins, acoustic guitar, background vocals
Doug Rhone, acoustic & electric guitars
Mark Casstevens, acoustic guitar
Gary Nicholson, acoustic guitar
Steve Gibson, acoustic guitar
Biff Watson, acoustic guitar
Paul Worley, acoustic guitar
Brent Mason, electric guitar
Brent Rowan, electric guitar
Chris Leuzinger, electric guitar
Dan Huff, electric guitar
Bruce Bouton, lap steel & pedal steel guitars
Sam Bush, mandolin, fiddle
Jonathan Yudkin, fiddle
Andrea Zonn, fiddle
Tammy Rogers, fiddle
Mark O'Connor, fiddle
Rob Hajacos, fiddle
Nashville String Machine
Bob Gaudio, accordion, background vocals
Jo-El Sonnier, accordion
Matt Rollings, piano, Hammond B-3 organ
Dennis Burnside, piano, Hammond B-3 organ
Alan Lindgren, piano, Hammond B-3 organ, keyboards
Al Kooper, Hammond B-3 organ
David Hungate, acoustic bass, bass
Michael Rhodes, bass
Reinie Press, bass
Dave Pomeroy, fretless bass
Ron Tutt, drums
Paul Leim, drums
Chester Thompson, drums
Lonnie Wilson, drums, percussion
Sam Bacco, percussion
John Wesley Ryles, background vocals
Dennis Wilson, background vocals
Curtis Wright, background vocals
Curtis Young, background vocals
Jana King, background vocals
Stephanie Bentley, background vocals
Harry Stinson, background vocals
Debra Black, background vocals
Kathy Burdick, background vocals
Bill LaBounty, background vocals
Melodie Crittenden, background vocals
Beth Hooker, background vocals

Recorded 1995, Dark Horse Recording Studio Engineered by Mike Bradley, Bernie Becker, Justin Niebank Mixed by Chris Lord-Alge; Justin Neibank; Mike Bradley. Produced by Bob Gaudio, Paul Worley, Don Cook, Richard Landis, James Stroud

Digitally remastered


Neil Diamond
For Neil Diamond, it’s always started with a song. Over the course of his astonishing career, Neil has sold more than 128 million albums worldwide. He’s charted 56 songs on the Billboard Hot 100, including 12 top 10 hits, and has released 16 Top 10 albums. He’s a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame, and in 2011, he was honored by the Kennedy Center for his lifetime of contributions to American culture. Neil has been nominated for three Golden Globes, 13 Grammys, and was named NARAS’ MusiCares Person of the Year in 2009. His 2008 album, Home Before Dark, debuted in the US and UK at #1, and his songs have been covered by artists ranging from Elvis Presley to Andrea Boccelli. But he never would have reached the world, from sold-out concerts to seventh-inning stretches, without his love for songwriting.

In June, after more than forty years as a Columbia recording artist, Neil signed with Capitol Records and moved his back catalogue to Universal, Capitol’s parent company. He has history with both: his earliest hits were on Bang, a Universal imprint, and Capitol released the multi-platinum soundtrack for The Jazz Singerin 1980, which earned Neil three Top 10 singles. Melody Road, his first new original studio album since Home Before Dark, is Neil’s debut as a Capitol artist, and while it represents a new chapter for him, it also reconnects him with his past.

Neil describes Melody Road as a homecoming. It brings him back to the start of his musical journey and the early influence of artists like the Weavers and Woody Guthrie. The songs on the album reflect his lifelong love of folk music. The vocals were recorded live, in much the same way they would have been if the album had been created decades ago, and while the instrumentation is lush, the arrangements are traditional. Like the best folk songs, each of the album’s tracks tells a story, most pointedly on “Seongah and Jimmy,” a song about Neil’s American brother-in-law and Korean sister-in-law, who met and fell in love before they had learned to speak each other’s languages. Despite the specificity of the song, it addresses a universal theme. Melody Road is largely autobiographical, but the stories Neil tells are not his alone.

Neil began working on Melody Road with several new songs, as well as a few that he’d struggled to complete for more than ten years. He couldn’t find the motivation, or the willingness to address the subject matter that initially inspired them, or – in Neil’s words – they weren’t yet ready to be born. With an emotional assist from his wife Katie, he completed those tracks. By the time he was ready to record he had an album’s worth of songs ready to go. The record unfolds story by story, and song by song – the final sequence is exactly the same as the order of Neil’s original demos for the album.

Co-Produced by Don Was (who’s worked with Bob Dylan and The Rolling Stones) and Jacknife Lee (R.E.M., U2), Melody Road was made with a masterful group of musicians, including pedal steel player Greg Liesz, keyboardist Benmont Tench, guitarist Smoky Hormel, and vocalists the Waters Family. Built on guitars, it’s true to the origin of folk, but it’s not defined by it; it was recorded with keyboards, flutes, horns, and, on “Seongah and Jimmy,” “The Art of Love,” and “Nothing But A Heartache,” a full string section. Yet, for all of its expansiveness and rich production, Melody Road is ultimately all about the songs. Neil’s come full circle. He’s brought five decades of extraordinary craftsmanship with him, but he’s returned to where he started, propelled by the simple joy of translating life into song.

This album contains no booklet.

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