Beethoven: Symphony No. 9, Op. 125 "Choral" (Remastered) Otto Klemperer

Album info

Album-Release:
2020

HRA-Release:
20.03.2020

Label: Warner Classics

Genre: Classical

Subgenre: Choral

Album including Album cover

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  • Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827): Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125 "Choral":
  • 1Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125 "Choral": I. Allegro ma non troppo, un poco maestoso17:02
  • 2Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125 "Choral": II. Molto vivace - Presto15:38
  • 3Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125 "Choral": III. Adagio molto e cantabile - Andante moderato15:00
  • 4Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125 "Choral": IV. Presto - "O Freunde, nicht diese Töne!" (Ode to Joy)24:35
  • Total Runtime01:12:15

Info for Beethoven: Symphony No. 9, Op. 125 "Choral" (Remastered)



This selection from Warner Classics brings the venerable Otto Klemperer at the lead of the Philharmonia orchestra in a stunning rendition of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony.

Klemperer (1885-1973) was born in Breslau (now Wroclaw, Poland). He studied at the Frankfurt Conservatory, then at Berlin's Klindworth-Scharwenka Conservatory, where he took lessons in composition and conducting from Pfitzner, making his debut in Berlin in 1906 with Offenbach's Orphée aux enfers. On Mahler's recommendation he became chorus master then conductor at Prague's German Theatre (1907-10); between 1910 and 1917 he worked at the opera houses of Hamburg, Bremen and Strasbourg; he was musical director at Cologne (1917-24), Wiesbaden (1924-27) and Berlin's Kroll Opera (1927–31), but left Nazi Germany in 1933, eventually settling in the USA, where he became conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic (1933-39).

After a brain tumour operation in 1939 his career faltered until he became director of the Hungarian State Opera (1947-50). In the 1950s and 60s he achieved great success, largely through his association with the Philharmonia Orchestra in London and his recordings for EMI. In 1959 he was appointed the Philharmonia's 'conductor for life'. His last concert was in September 1971.

"…Otto Klemperer's energy and momentum come not from his tempos but from the way the rhythms are articulated. In the first movement and Scherzo the heroic, teeth-gritted determination are physically gripping, In this Ninth combined urgency with masterly control and spellbinding authority, and a dignity all his own." (BBC Music Magazine)

"As I've already suggested, the stereo sound is excellent. In particular, London concertgoers will recognise the Royal Festival Hall's dry but clear acoustic, an admirable space for Klemperer's unfussy but penetrating conducting. With applause fore and aft, and between-movement coughs and tuning, this is the concert as it took place - a magnificent Beethoven 9. Hearty thanks to Testament for issuing this wonderful document of Klemperer's greatness - caught on the wing." (Colin Anderson, MusicWeb International)

Aase Nordmo-Løvberg, soprano
Christa Ludwig, contralto
Waldemar Kmentt, tenor
Hans Hotter, bass
Philharmonia Chorus & Orchestra
Otto Klemperer, conductor

Recorded live 15.11.1957 at the Festival Hall, London

Digitally remastered


Otto Klemperer
The German conductor Otto Klemperer (1885-1973) was born in Breslau (now Wroclaw, Poland). He studied at the Frankfurt Conservatory, then at Berlin's Klindworth-Scharwenka Conservatory, where he took lessons in composition and conducting from Pfitzner, making his debut in Berlin in 1906 with Offenbach's Orphée aux enfers. On Mahler's recommendation he became chorus master then conductor at Prague's German Theatre (1907-10); between 1910 and 1917 he worked at the opera houses of Hamburg, Bremen and Strasbourg; he was musical director at Cologne (1917-24), Wiesbaden (1924-27) and Berlin's Kroll Opera (1927–31), but left Nazi Germany in 1933, eventually settling in the USA, where he became conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic (1933-39).

After a brain tumour operation in 1939 his career faltered until he became director of the Hungarian State Opera (1947-50). In the 1950s and 60s he achieved great success, largely through his association with the Philharmonia Orchestra in London and his recordings for EMI. In 1959 he was appointed the Philharmonia's 'conductor for life'. His last concert was in September 1971. Many of Klemperer's fine EMI recordings are available in the Great Recordings of the Century series.

This album contains no booklet.

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