Keep It Simple (Remastered) Dick Haymes

Cover Keep It Simple (Remastered)

Album info

Album-Release:
2019

HRA-Release:
10.05.2019

Label: 2xHD

Genre: Jazz

Subgenre: Vocal

Album including Album cover Booklet (PDF)

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Formats & Prices

FormatPriceIn CartBuy
FLAC 192 $ 15.80
DSD 64 $ 15.80
  • 1The More I See You03:12
  • 2I Get Along Without You Very Well02:57
  • 3Little White Lies02:50
  • 4Almost Like Being in Love: Brigadoon: Almost Like Being In Love01:58
  • 5I'll Remember April02:53
  • 6State Fair: That's for Me - It Might as Well Be Spring04:20
  • 7Of Thee I sing: Who cares?02:41
  • 8Stella by Starlight: The Uninvited: Stella by Starlight01:53
  • 9The Very Thought of You02:27
  • 10The Goldwyn Follies: Love Is Here to Stay03:30
  • 11The Goldwyn Follies: Love Walked In02:33
  • 12Hello Frisco: You'll Never Know02:30
  • 13Iceland: There Will Never Be Another You02:30
  • Total Runtime36:14

Info for Keep It Simple (Remastered)



Along with Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra, Dick Haymes was one of the most popular male crooners of the 1940s and 1950s. This recording combines tracks from two studio sessions made under the direction of Loonis McGlohon. The first was done in October 1976 and the second in May 1978 when Haymes was almost 60. (The latter turned out to be his final visit to a recording studio before his death in 1980.) And unlikely as it seems, his voice was at its strongest on the later date. The 1978 session was one of the most fulfilling of a recording career. This album features songs that Haymes was associated with over that career; there's "Little White Lies," added to a Decca record in 1947 as an afterthought and which became one of Haymes' biggest hits, a medley of songs from the movie State Fair, including "It Might as Well Be Spring" and "That's for Me." plus songs he just felt he wanted to do for this album.

This album is a testimonial to a very unique talent and to a singing style that has practically become extinct.

"This Audiophile recording combines two Dick Haymes sessions made under the direction of Loonis McGlohon. The firstwas done in October 1976 and the second in May 1978 when Haymes was almost 60. (The latter turned out to be his final visit to a recording studio before his death in 1980.) And unlikely as it seems, his voice was at its strongest on the later date. The 1978 session was one of the most fulfilling of a recording career which started in the 1940s with Harry James when he replaced Frank Sinatra, who had moved to Tommy Dorsey’s band. Along with Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra, he was one of the most popular male crooners of the 1940s and 1950s. Recurring public personal difficulties eventually became a drag on his career. This album features songs that Haymes was associated with over that career, plus songs he just felt he wanted to do for this album. There’s «Little White Lies,» added to a Decca record in 1947 as an afterthought and which became one of Haymes’ biggest hits. The album also offers a medley of songs from the movie State Fair, including «It Might as Well Be Spring» and «That’s for Me.» While these were big sellers for Haymes, he did not introduce them in that 1945 film. The former was dubbed by Louanne Hogan for Jeanne Crain. Vivian Blaine sang the second. The length of each performance reflects Haymes’ professional roots in the 78-rpm days. Most of the tunes are done in under 2½ minutes. Bravo! There are some current-day male singers who would do well to emulate this time-management technique. Arguably the finest singer of ballads to grace the popular song scene, with the possible exception of Johnny Hartman, this album is a testimonial to a very unique talent and to a singing style that has practically become extinct." (Dave Nathan, AllMusic)

Dick Haymes, vocals
Rust Loonis McGlohony, leader, arr., piano
Rusty Gilder, bass
Loonis McGlohon, piano

Digitally remastered



Dick Haymes
When big band aficionados gather to discuss their favorite crooners of the Big Band period, inevitably three names come up. Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, and Argentinian-born Dick Haymes. Haymes was perhaps one of the most popular vocalists of the 1940’s and 1950’s. Born to Irish and British parents in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1918, his parents traveled extensively until immigrating to the United States. He was the older brother of actor Bob Haymes.

By the mid-30s, the Haymes family moved to Los Angeles and the handsome seventeen year old Dick found work in Hollywood as a motion picture double. But it was his interest in singing that made him quit the film business to relocate to New York in search of work as a big band vocalist. The now nineteen year old’s boyish good looks, charm and natural singing ability opened up doors to sing with several bands in the Big Apple. After writing a few songs in 1939, he approached bandleader Harry James, and while James wasn’t impressed with Dick’s music writing abilities, he was impressed with his singing skills and eventually hired Haymes on as vocalist to replace Frank Sinatra when Sinatra left the James organization to work for Tommy Dorsey. It would not be the only time at Dick Haymes followed in Sinatra’s footsteps.

On September 3rd, 1942, Frank Sinatra introduced Haymes on radio as Sinatra’s replacement in the Tommy Dorsey band when Sinatra went “solo”. By 1945 Hollywood called again- this time opening doors for the now famous singer to co-star with Jeanne Crain, Dana Andrews and Vivian Blaine in the musical film production of “State Fair.”

It was during the war years that Dick Haymes enjoyed some of his greatest hits, teaming with vocalist Helen Forrest on several million-sellers including “Together,” “I’ll Buy That Dream,” and “Long Ago & Far Away”. Haymes also made two recordings with Judy Garland for Decca Records of songs from the film “The Shocking Miss Pilgrim” (in which he starred with Betty Grable).

From 1944 to 1948, he had his own radio program, ‘The Dick Haymes Show’, first on NBC and later on CBS. In the post-war years Dick Haymes frequently performed with the Andrews Sisters on multiple Decca Records recording sessions, including hit tunes “Teresa,” “Great Day,” and “My Sin”. His duets with Patty Andrews were also well received. In 1947 he teamed once again with the Andrews Sisters and fellow crooner Bing Crosby resulting in the million-selling hit “There’s No Business Like Show Business,” as well as “Anything You Can Do (I Can Do Better).” His popular renditions of tender ballads such as “Little White Lies” and “Maybe It’s Because” were recorded with Sinatra arranger Gordon Jenkins and his orchestra.

In the late ‘40s and early ‘50s Haymes hosted radio’s “Club Fifteen” with the Andrews Sisters, and briefly enjoyed a whirlwind romance and tw

o-year marriage to film star Rita Hayworth. He would marry a total of six times.

Dick Haymes was one of the finest male ballad singers of the big band era, considered by many to be the near-equal of the likes of Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra. Dick Haymes talent shines through in his hits “It Can’t Be Wrong,” “Till the End of Time,” and “It Might as Well Be Spring.” In the 1960’s and 1970’s, Haymes continued performing and recorded a live album at the Ambassador Hotel’s Cocoanut Grove in Los Angeles. He last recorded in 1978, and lost his long bout with cancer at the age of 61 in 1980. Dick Haymes’ Centennial birthday was September 13th, 2018.

Booklet for Keep It Simple (Remastered)

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