Walk Between Worlds Simple Minds

Album info

Album-Release:
2018

HRA-Release:
02.02.2018

Album including Album cover

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  • 1Magic04:35
  • 2Summer04:57
  • 3Utopia04:14
  • 4The Signal and the Noise05:18
  • 5In Dreams04:15
  • 6Barrowland Star06:25
  • 7Walk Between Worlds05:12
  • 8Sense of Discovery06:26
  • 9Silent Kiss04:57
  • 10Angel Underneath My Skin03:43
  • 11Dirty Old Town (Live)04:53
  • Total Runtime54:55

Info for Walk Between Worlds

On February 2nd 2018 Simple Minds will release their newest album ‘Walk Between Worlds’. The studio album is the follow-up to the 2014 released “Big Music” and the 2016 release “Acoustic” which had re-recorded acoustic versions of their biggest hits. The new album “Walk Between Worlds” counts 8 tracks and was recorded at the Abbey Road Studio and was produced by the band together with Andy Wright and Gavin Goldberg.

Walk Between Worlds was produced by Simple Minds with Andy Wright and Gavin Goldberg, both of whom worked on Big Music. With its eight tracks rocketing past in 42 minutes, it is a relatively concise affair. It is also an album of two distinct sides, very much the old-school album format that singer Jim Kerr and Charlie Burchill grew up with as music fans. Side One tracks such as "Summer" and "The Signal And The Noise" revisit the glassy guitars and new wave dance grooves of the post-punk era and the second half explores more cinematic sounds, with the title track and "Barrowland Star" both featuring dramatic orchestrations recorded at Abbey Road.

The album is bookended by two songs about faith, "Magic" and "Sense Of Discovery." The first is a reflection on the desire and hunger of youth – the faith in their own abilities that Simple Minds possessed during their formative years. "Sense Of Discovery," which features a melodic refrain that alludes to 1985’s "Alive And Kicking," is centred on the voice of an older narrator passing on wisdom and advice to a younger individual.

One of the album’s key tracks is "Barrowland Star," named after the iconic ballroom in the East End of Glasgow that has hosted many memorable Simple Minds shows. It’s a song that takes the band away from their traditional comfort zone, layering strings and a spellbinding Charlie guitar solo (one that reminds Jim of Mick Ronson) over some poignant words. For Jim and Charlie playing the Barrowland was always a big deal, a mixture of excitement – and fear – it felt as if they were about to engage in a prize-fight rather than simply play a rock concert.

The album artwork is by Brazilian visual artist Heitor Magno, whose work is often a surreal montage of vivid coloured imagery and black and white photography. The image he has created for Walk Between Worlds is emblematic of Simple Minds' metamorphosis. The central character on the front cover bearing an uncanny resemblance to a young Jim Kerr – the sleeve could also be viewed as a telling throwback to the Sons And Fascination era.

Simple Minds were the standard bearers for a new kind of rock in the Eighties, when they took the art-rock invention of post-punk and constructed a musical Colossus by adding rousing choruses and a touch of Celtic soul. As they contemplate turning 40, their legacy is something to be proud of and with Walk Between Worlds their story continues to evolve.

Simple Minds will take to the road in February 2018 to premiere Walk Between Worlds in three shows, which will be in three parts: a performance of the album, a live on-stage interview and a classic Simple Minds set, which will include the band further re-imagining and exploring songs from their extensive catalogue. For fans it will be a very special, one-of-a-kind experience.

With Jim and Charlie now part of a theatrical gang of musicians that are, in Jim’s words, ‘more inspired by the likes Sly & The Family Stone than a traditional male rock band’, the tour will feature the Acoustic tour line up of: Jim and Charlie, percussionist Cherisse Osei and backing vocalist Catherine AD alongside band mainstays Ged Grimes on bass, multi-instrumentalist Gordy Goudie, and regular backing singer (and sometimes lead vocalist) Sarah Brown. ‘The whole stage set-up is now more fluid,’ says Charlie. ‘We’re working on fresh arrangements of some old songs, and there is going to be more movement between the musicians onstage. There will be time for people to digest the songs and more space for Jim to talk to the audience.’

As much as it has been a real pleasure to work on Walk Between Worlds, equally so it is thrilling to observe that the Simple Minds story continues to evolve both in the studio and on the live stage. Sensing that each of these songs are destined to become individual events when played live - we look forward to performing all of them alongside already established live classics when we set out on this next upcoming tour. - Jim Kerr

Simple Minds




Simple Minds
Best known in the U.S. for their 1985 number one hit "Don't You (Forget About Me)" from the film The Breakfast Club, Scotland's Simple Minds evolved from a post-punk art rock band influenced by Roxy Music into a grand, epic-sounding pop band along the lines of U2. The band grew out of a Glasgow punk group called Johnny and the Self-Abusers, which featured guitarist Charlie Burchill and lead singer Jim Kerr. The inaugural 1978 lineup of Simple Minds featured a rhythm section of Tony Donald on bass and Brian McGee on drums, plus keyboardist Mick McNeil; Donald was soon replaced by Derek Forbes. Their early albums leaped from one style to another, with Life in a Day consisting mostly of dense, arty pop songs; critical acclaim followed the darker, more experimental art rock of Reel to Real Cacophony and the Euro-disco of Empires and Dance. The group began a transition to a more accessible pop style with the albums Sons and Fascination and Sister Feelings Call, originally issued together and subsequently split up. New Gold Dream (81-82-83-84) became their first chart album in the U.S., and the tour-shy McGee quit owing to burgeoning popularity, eventually being replaced by Mel Gaynor. Following the Steve Lillywhite-produced Sparkle in the Rain, Jim Kerr married Pretenders lead singer Chrissie Hynde (the two groups had toured together).

After Bryan Ferry rejected the opportunity to sing "Don't You (Forget About Me)," Simple Minds almost did so as well; Kerr was dissatisfied with the song's lyrics, which he regarded as formulaic. His change of heart gave Simple Minds their only American chart-topper, and the song later became an international hit as well; however, Kerr's feelings about the song remained ambivalent, and it did not appear on the follow-up album, Once Upon a Time. This album went gold and reached the U.S. Top Ten, in spite of criticism for its bombastic, over-the-top approach. A live album and the uncompromisingly political Street Fighting Years squandered Simple Minds' commercial momentum, however. By the time the group returned to more personal themes and its straightforward, anthemic rock on 1991's Real Life, personnel changes and audience loss left the group's future viability in doubt. But they weren't totally deterred, however. Kerr and Burchill trudged on, releasing Good News From the Next World in 1995 while the single "She's a River" received moderate airplay. A short tour of North America soon followed, but Simple Minds' direction also quickly faded. They needed a break to clarify their own personal stance in music. Derek Forbes returned for 1998's Néapolis, but that, too, wasn't strong enough to sustain Simple Minds' newfound creativity. Their famed pop songs had diluted a bit; however, the new millennium proved poignant. Jim Kerr and Charlie Burchill signed to Eagle Records in early 2001 and constructed their first covers album, Neon Lights, later that fall, paying tribute to Patti Smith, Neil Young, David Bowie, and others. In summer 2002, Kerr and Burchill issued Cry, Simple Minds' first batch of new material since 1995's Good News From the Next World. Our Secrets Are the Same, an album that was intended for release in 2000, saw official release in 2003. An extensive reissue program and live recordings followed. Black and White, a new studio album, appeared in 2005, and the charting Grafitti Soul in 2009 (which saw the return of original drummer Mel Gaynor to the fold). Simple Minds accepted a spot at London's iTunes Festival that year and issued a digital EP of their performance. After a global tour, Simple Minds returned with Big Music in 2014, an album that included two songs co-written with Chvrches' Ian Cook.

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